Review of Rogue Protocol by Martha Wells

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Rogue Protocol is a novella, the third in the Murderbot Diaries series, following All Systems Red and Artificial Condition. It was released by Tor/McMillan in August 2018. Exit Strategy, the last installment of this series, is due in October 2018.

Finished with investigating its half-memories of a massacre at Ganaka mining pit, Murderbot hitches a ride on a passenger transport this time, planning to look into the activities of the GrayCris Corporation that attempted to assassinate Dr. Mensah’s team. Because it’s representing itself as a security consultant, it has to endure and mediate the conflicts the human passengers on this trip, but finally makes it to the transit station for Milu. It appears that GrayCris is illegally mining alien artifacts, and Milu is an abandoned terraforming operation that could easily have been used as a cover. The facility’s new owners have sent a team for assessment, and Murderbot catches a ride to the venue with their human security team. The security team has ulterior motives and the facility is hazardous, so problems quickly develop. Can Murderbot rescue the assessment team? Can it find evidence against GrayCris to help Dr. Mensah with her charges against the corporation? Stay tuned.

This installment of the story has many of the same good points as the original novella, including great characters and lots of strategy and action. This installment also makes more sense in the overall arc of the series than Artificial Condition did, as Murderbot has a specific objective related to Dr. Mensah and GrayCris.

It appears that Murderbot is getting more comfortable in the human world, and it’s starting to feel confined in small storage lockers. I’m not sure if this is evolution of the character or just that somehow it’s crossing over the line and becoming a little too human. The industrial machine quality of its personality is part of its charm, and I’ve not been thrilled with its emotional issues. Whatever, we seem to be working through those.

For a novella, this installment is still not worth the price, but almost (total cost of 4 e-book versions will be about USD$35). As a full-length novel, I’m thinking the series arc will be episodic, something like a TV mini-series that has to entertain weekly, but still make sense on a larger scale. This quality makes it hard to implement character development and world building, and I think both are suffering a bit from the structure of the work. It would be great if Wells could provide us a more in-depth adventure for the same characters.

Minor content editing issues. Four stars.

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Review of “The Secret Life of Bots” by Suzanne Palmer

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This novelette is a finalist for the 2018 Hugo Award. It’s science fiction and was published by Clarkesworld, September 2017. This review may contain spoilers.

Multi Bot 9 is wakened from storage to remove a “biological infestation” on the ship. It sets to work pursuing the vermin, which is highly destructive, something like a rat and something like a bug. Bot 9 is obsolete, and notices its job is 944 in the maintenance queue. This suggests the ship needs a lot of work. There are lots of newer bots working on the maintenance and Bot 9 makes their acquaintance, as well as chatting with the ship’s AI. Soon it realizes that the ship is a junker, has a minimal human crew and is on a final suicide mission to save humanity from an alien invasion. Can Bot 9 fix that problem, too?

Bot 9 is endearing because of its totally positive attitude, regardless of how nasty the vermin. Its abilities might be limited compared to later models and Captain Baraye calls the model “unstable,” but its primitive manufacture also allows for reconfiguration and improvisation. When you transfer this theme to the real world, the story demonstrates the kind of gung-ho spirit and creativity that solves even the toughest problems. The narrative switches back and forth between the desperate humans trying to carry out their mission on a crippled ship and the bots trying to fix it well enough to carry out the planned suicide. The bot interactions add humor, and of course the humans are totally flabbergasted when 9’s activities are revealed. The plotting and execution here are both creative and entertaining.

On the not so great side, this has the fairly standard failing of making the bots and the ship’s AI too human in their interactions. That means it fails on suspension of disbelief. The ship’s AI, especially, comes across as an indulgent parent figure that makes good-hearted threats to the bots and lies to the human crew. At the end of the story, we get the impression that 9 plans to ignore its orders like a willful child. Besides that, I didn’t think there was enough of a rising action line to support the story’s length. Nine’s pursuit of the ratbug gets routine fairly quickly and seeing the incident from its perspective insulates the reader from the drama of the human’s situation.

Four stars.

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Review of Artificial Condition by Martha Wells

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This is volume 2 of The Murderbot Diaries, begun in 2017 with the entertaining and award winning All Systems Red. It’s a novella published by Tor/MacMillian and runs 160 pages. This review may contain spoilers.

Murderbot has successfully escaped a quiet existence at PreservationAux and set out to find what its dark half-memories of a massacre are about. The transport it hitched a ride on arrives in port, and Murderbot transfers to another outbound transport, headed for the Ganaka mining pit where it thinks the massacre took place. This time, however, it has hit on a highly intelligent research vessel hired out for transport by its university. The two of them get off to a rough start, but ART (Asshole Research Transport) eventually comes around to the point of helping with Murderbot’s mission. Murderbot hires out as a security consultant to a group of young humans trying to get their research files back from a local company that confiscated them. This is intended for emigration purposes, but Murderbot gets involved in their problem. Meanwhile, news that it’s a rogue SecUnit has emerged. Can it keep the kids alive and find out about its past before the authorities catch up with it?

Good points: The interactions with ART are pretty much a necessity to deal with the realities here. ART challenges Murderbot’s stubborn, poorly thought out assumptions about how it can masquerade as a human and get to Ganaka Pit to find out what happened there. ART is a great character with some pretty transparent failings itself, and the two of them turn out to be a good team. Murderbot contracts for work itself and shows the same empathy and responsibility on the job that it showed for the last set of clients, which is some of the heart-warming part. The rest of it is ART, a super-intelligent, empathetic creature trapped forever in the cold vacuum of space, who wants to ride along for a while and experience a taste of the human world.

On the not so good side: It looks like the four installments of this will make up a full-length novel, but each installment is priced like a full-length novel. This installment feels short and incompletely developed (i.e. not worth the price), but hopefully the further installments will integrate it into the story better. I’m of the opinion that events and characters shouldn’t be introduced unless they’re going to contribute to the overall plot. In this case, it appears that Murderbot has rescued the kids and their files and neutralized all threats against them. However, this company had better be part of the Ganaka Pit problem, or else it’s just leading the reader on. As the novella ends, there’s no indication of this connection.

Minor editing issues. Three and a half stars.

Review of “Utopia LOL?” By Jaime Wahls

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This short story is a finalist for the 2017 Nebula Award, published by Strange Horizons. According to the biography with the story, Wahls works for the Machine Intelligence Research Institute, a nonprofit corporation that does basic research on the question of how to make super-intelligent machines safe and beneficial. This review contains spoilers.

Kit is the Tour Guide to the Future and full of enthusiasm for her job. When Charlie is thawed out after “like billions” of years in cold storage, she is there to towel him off, get his cancer fixed and give him an introduction to life as it is now. She introduces him to the AI Allocator and offers him simulated Universes to live in. Charlie is unhappy with life as a bird and rejects Kit’s recommendation that he try floor tiles, and chooses a LOTR universe instead. After a few years, Charlie is bored silly, and Kit and the Allocator have to find something else to fill his need to be productive. Would Charlie be interested in a star probe?

In case you can’t tell from the summary, this is humor. Kit is a total airhead, and likes to be a floor tile because it allows her to form complete thoughts. The story also pillories social media, cos players, over-obsessive fans, smug perfect people, gamers and various other unproductive devotees of popular culture. There is also a serious side, as the Allocator is in charge of providing for humanity. It is constrained by its programming and facing the issue of overpopulation and the ongoing destruction of Earth. If they’re all like Kit, maybe humanity is well on the way to self-destruction, too. The stock of humans in cryostorage represents a resource to deal with these crises. This is pretty clear, but then the story goes off the rails into vagueness at the end when they start talking about a memory wipe for Kit.

I didn’t understand this, so I went looking for other opinions. The best explanation I found was that Kit is valuable for her total air headedness and her enthusiasm, and Allocator wants to preserve this for its next candidate for revival. Presumably this is because of its programming, which requires that humans have to want something from it and provide affirmative consent to its recommendations, and that Kit has a predictable effect on the old-timers. This doesn’t quite hold water for me.

Humans in this future (except the cold storage ones) are post-Singularity, only an uploaded digitized consciousness. I can accept that Allocator’s resources are running low to support the human population, but I don’t see how a digitized consciousness can reproduce at all, much less at an unmanageable rate. Also, I don’t see how Allocator can memory-wipe a digitized consciousness without altering what she is. Couldn’t it just produce a disposable copy? And what’s the deal with sending just one person off on a star probe? If they find a great place, how is one person going to procreate? Cloning? Who’s going to be in charge of this? Hm.

Regardless of the niggling logical failures, this is a hugely successful story because of the scope and humor.

Four and a half stars.

Review of A Closed and Common Orbit, by Becky Chambers

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This novel is a Hugo finalist published by Hodder & Stoughton/Harper Voyager US. It’s Chambers’ second novel and billed as space opera, a sequel to The Long Way to a Small, Angry Planet.

Lovelace is a ship’s AI that tech genius Pepper has illegally downloaded from Wayfarer and installed in a synthetic humanoid “kit.” Lovelace struggles to adjust as the two of them travel to Pepper’s home on Coriol and meet Pepper’s partner Blue. Lovelace chooses a new name, Sidra, and goes to work in Pepper’s fix-it shop. In another thread that happens years before, the child-slave clone Jane 23 (later Pepper) escapes from a factory and takes refuge in an abandoned shuttle. She is mothered by the AI Owl and works to get the shuttle running again. The two threads converge as Pepper and her friends mount an expedition to rescue Owl.

This novel is very readable, suitable for young-adult, and seems to be about inclusion. Everyone is respected and appreciated on Coriol and worthy of hugs, regardless of disability, alien race or AI status. This is in contrast to the unseen Enhanced who run the slave factories. The AIs are generally warm, fuzzy and well-behaved, and the story is very character and friendship oriented.

On the con side, this vision of AI falls well on the fantasy side. It’s true the ship’s AIs could be sociable, but these two are just too sweet and lovable to be real. It’s also unbelievable that people would interact with any kind of affordable “kit” and not realize it’s synthetic. The novel is billed as space opera, but there are none of the battles or struggles for the soul of the universe that you’d expect from this sub-genre. Why doesn’t anyone here challenge the Enhanced and their slave-based factory system?

Three stars.

Review of “The Long Fall Up” by William Ledbetter

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This novelette is a Nebula finalist published by The Magazine of Fantasy & Science Fiction. It ended up with 8 recommendations on the Nebula Recommended Reading List.

Humanity has built a Bernal type space habitat with a population of about 27K people. Fertility and therefore expansion into space is controlled by a large corporation based on research that indicates embryos don’t develop properly in zero gravity. Veronica challenges this restriction by getting pregnant and heading outbound in a spacecraft. The corporation sends an agent to bring her back, and he eventually starts to see this as a rescue mission. However, he finds the AI in his craft is programmed to eliminate both Veronica and the developing fetus. He works to outsmart it, but now Veronica has gone into labor. Will he be in time for his rescue?

I actually read this one when it was published and I can’t find my copy of the magazine right now to refresh my experience with it. However, here’s what I recall. Pros: This is hard SF, which I’m glad to see on the ballot. It’s strongly plotted and, as far as I could tell, well researched and accurate as far as space travel and AIs go. It leans fairly heavily to technical details, mounting tension and emotional impact, so tends to neglect characterizations, imagery, etc. Because of this, it didn’t have the emotional impact it would have had if we’d known Veronica better.

Cons: This is still another story about abusing and/or murdering children. I’m up to six in the count so far in this year’s reviews.

Three and a half stars.

Review of Independence Day: Resurgence

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Orion,_battle_spaceship
This film is a sequel the 1996 film Independence Day. It was directed by Roland Emmerich and written by Roland Emmerich, Dean Devlin, Nicholas Wright, James A. Woods and James Vanderbilt. It’s distributed by 20th Century Fox. For anyone unfamiliar with the 1996 film, Earth had to repel an alien invasion.

The film picks up about twenty years after the last one ended. The UN has set up the Earth Space Defense (ESD) system and has researched alien technology to use against future alien invasions. There are now military bases on the moon, Mars and Saturn’s moon Rhea. ESD director David Levinson meets with Dr. Catherine Marceaux and African Dikembe Umbutu who has found an intact alien ship that has sent a distress call their home planet. A strange ship appears near the moon base, and Levinson thinks it’s a different design from the last invasion, possibly a different race of aliens. The Security Council votes to destroy it anyway. Space tug pilots Jake Morrison and Charlie Miller pick up Levinson, Umbutu, Marceaux and accountant Rosenberg and head for the wreckage. They find a container but are interrupted by another alien ship that suddenly emerges and destroys the defense system before it can respond. The ship then begins to drill toward the Earth’s core in order to harvest the heat as fuel, which will destroy the Earth’s magnetic fields. Former President Whitmore interrogates a war captive and finds that a Queen is directing the invasion. An ESD fleet attacks the Queen’s chamber but they’re caught inside the alien ship. In Area 51 Dr. Okun has wakened from a 20-year coma. He opens the container and an AI reveals its mission is to locate and evacuate survivors of the energy Harvesters. Inside the aliens’ ship, the ESD fleet survivors steal alien fighters and follow the Queen’s ship, which is headed to Area 51 to destroy the AI. The ESD forces use the AI to lure the Queen’s ship into a trap and Whitmore volunteers to pilot a tug on the suicide mission. He sacrifices himself and destroys the alien ship, but the Queen survives. Whitmore’s daughter Patricia flies a fighter in a last-ditch effort to neutralize the Queen’s shields and allow the ESD forces to kill the Queen.

This is another watchable film. The script isn’t awe inspiring, but it has all the requirements, including the hot young fighter pilots, the older, self-sacrificing statesmen and the nerdy scientists. It has a lot of fast action and a touch of romance from the younger cast members. However, it’s another of those action-adventure flicks where you have to do a massive suspension of disbelief to cover the bad science and plot holes. Will Smith carried the first Independence Day, but there are no real standouts in this cast. Jeff Goldblum as Levinson probably does the most to carry it. Interesting, I was really taken by the space tugs. Animation has come a long way since Jar Jar Binks.

Three stars.

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