More on sales!

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I’ve sold another story. This one is a gothic dark fantasy about a wolf child, to be available in 2020.

“Possession” to Winter Wolf anthology, Deadman’s Tome

Also, Sensory Perceptions from Jay Henge is now available from booksellers. The link is to the Amazon listing. My story “The Mending Tool” about a lonely wife made the description in the listing. Enjoy!

Sensory Perception

Congrats to the 2019 World Fantasy Award Winners!

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Here’s something I meant to post a while back. I left a space for it and then didn’t get it posted. Since I’m running so far behind on it, I guess I should add some commentary to make reading it worthwhile.

First, the tie here in short fiction is interesting. This is a juried award, and there are 5 judges, which is supposed to mean there won’t be a tie. I read elsewhere that this was a unique situation, but actually there was a tie last year, too, in the Best Novel category. That means the results are a clue about how the judges come to a decision. It suggests that rather than blind ballot, the judges discuss the finalists and come to a consensus decision on who should be the winners. Not that this matters a whole lot, but it does offer some insight into their awards process. The end result ends up being fairly diverse, which suggests the judges took this into consideration.

Next, I don’t see much intersection between this award and the Dragons, even though the Dragons have 5 possibilities for a fantasy win. Presumably this is because the finalists in the Dragon’s didn’t submit to the (strongly literary) World Fantasy Award for consideration. I would have expected Little Darlings by Melanie Golding, for example, to compete well in the WFA.

Last, I’m glad to see Polk’s novel win a major award this year. Although her novel is low key and a fantasy romance, it still addressed some important social issues. I enjoyed her writing style, and I’ll try to get the sequel in the queue for a review when it’s released in February.

Interestingly, Barnes & Noble did a roundup of major awards (minus the Dragons) and pronounced The Calculating Stars: A Lady Astronaut Novel by Mary Robinette Kowal (Tor) the big winner this year with three awards, and Martha Wells and P. Djèlí Clark in a tie for second place with two awards each for Artificial Condition (Tor) and “The Nine Negro Teeth of George Washington” (Fireside Magazine). That means science fiction did somewhat better than fantasy this year in these particular awards.

Anyhow, for anyone who hasn’t seen the list, here are the WFA winners:

Best Novel: Witchmark by C.L. Polk (Tor.com Publishing)

Best Novella: “The Privilege of the Happy Ending“ by Kij Johnson (Clarkesworld 8/18)

Best Short Fiction (tie): “Ten Deals with the Indigo Snake” by Mel Kassel (Lightspeed 10/18) and “Like a River Loves the Sky” by Emma Törzs (Uncanny 3-4/18)

Best Anthology: Worlds Seen in Passing, by Irene Gallo, ed. (Tor.com Publishing)

Best Collection: The Tangled Lands by Paolo Bacigalupi & Tobias S. Buckell (Saga)

Best Artist: Rovina Cai

Special Award – Professional: Huw Lewis-Jones for The Writer’s Map: An Atlas of Imaginary Lands (University of Chicago Press)

Special Award – Non-Professional: Scott H. Andrews, for Beneath Ceaseless Skies

Wrap-up of the 2019 Dragon Reviews

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The Dragon Awards are pretty much impossible to review before the vote because of the short time between the announcement of the finalists and the end of the voting period. However, I don’t want to neglect them in any way, so this year I’ve gone on to review the 2019 fiction winners. For a look at the whole list of finalists, see my blog on it here.

First, here are the winners again:
Best SF Novel: A Star-Wheeled Sky, Brad R. Torgersen (Baen)
Best Fantasy Novel: House of Assassins, Larry Correia (Baen)
Best Young Adult Novel: Bloodwitch, Susan Dennard (Tor Teen)
Best Military SFF Novel: Uncompromising Honor by David Weber (Baen)
Best Alternate History Novel: Black Chamber by S.M. Stirling (Ace)
Best Horror Novel: Little Darlings by Melanie Golding (Crooked Lane)

As usual in my analysis, here the diversity count of the finalists:
Best SF Novel: 2 women, 5 men, 2 LGBTQ, 2 Jewish (Note: James S.A. Corey is 2 men)
Best Fantasy Novel: 3 women, 3 men, 1 LGBTQ, 2 Jewish, 1 Hispanic
Best Young Adult / Middle Grade Novel: 4 women, 3 men, 1 Jewish
Best Military Science Fiction or Fantasy Novel: 2 women, 6 men, 1 Hispanic
Best Alternate History Novel: 2 women, 4 men, 2 Jewish
Best Horror Novel: 2 women, 5 men, 1 Jewish.

Apologies if I missed anybody or mixed anybody up; it’s sometimes hard to tell about diversity from online biographies. There are other names in the list that look Jewish, for example, but I couldn’t confirm. The gender issue is complicated by the number of cowriters among the finalists, all men, as it turns out. Comparing on the numbers, the gender count works out to be 15/41 (37%) women and on the books 15/37 (41%). The minority count includes 3/41 (7%) LGBTQ, 8/41 (20%) Jewish and 2/41 (5%) Hispanic. I know there’s an argument about whether European Spanish/Portuguese should be considered Hispanic—this category in the US generally counts Latino writers, who are typically mixed race—but I’ve just noted the names here as Hispanic, as I’m not sure how they identify.

So, the ~40% gender count on female-written books isn’t bad, considering that the categories separate SF and fantasy and include a military SF category that you’d expect might skew the results. The LGBTQ count turns out very low compared to say, the Hugo Awards, but it’s actually sitting fairly close to the 4.5% self-identified US demographic. Like most of the awards this year, the count for Jewish writers is much higher than their US demographic of 2%. Other than this, the diversity count really sucks. I’ve had to really stretch for the Hispanic names, as Corriea and Cordova are both likely of European extraction, and there aren’t any apparent black, Arab, Asian, Native American, trans or non-binary writers in this list at all. It’s clear that white writers were strongly preferred by the voting population, leaning to men, especially in the winners (4/6 or 67%). This isn’t unexpected for a popular award; the Hugos, for example, also leaned heavily (75%) to white winners this year, only to women instead of men.

Because of the way the categories are set up, there’s more diversity in the subject matter and type of work in this award than some others, with science fiction getting equal standing against fantasy, and military SF, alternate history, young adult and horror each getting their own categories. There was more diversity in publishers in the Dragons than in some other awards I’ve looked at, too. Tor had the highest count of finalists 5/37 (14%), with Orbit and Baen coming in next, both at 3/37 (8%). Two of the finalists were self-published (5%). On the other hand, all three of the Baen publications came in as winners.

I notice there’s been discussion online about the “legitimacy” of the Dragon Awards, questions about how they are administered and suggestions they’re a vehicle for the Sad/Rabid Puppies faction of the SFF community. Although Vox Day and the Rabid Pups made a good showing in the first year (and actually brought greater diversity), at this point I don’t see any indication this group has any real control of the awards. The award administrators encourage campaigning and voting by avid fan groups, so organization by particular groups to try and vote their candidate in isn’t against the rules. The results strongly suggest a different audience is voting on this than the Hugos, Nebulas and World Fantasy Award, but given the nature of the convention and the categories of fiction, I think that’s pretty much to be expected. The Dragon Award does seem to be suffering from the widespread tendency of the awards voting populations to nominate the same names every year. James S.A. Corey, Chris Kennedy, Mark Wandrey, David Weber, Kacey Ezell and S.M. Stirling were also finalists in 2018. James S.A. Corey, Becky Chambers, Larry Corriea and Mark Wandrey were also finalists in 2017.

As far as literary quality of the work goes, my reviews noted the same kind of wide variation I’ve seen in other awards systems. These novels are popular favorites, fairly straightforward, and only Little Darlings has the kind of strong subtext that I’d consider “literary” writing, though Black Chamber might be satire. The repetition of names from year to year suggests the voting population tends to vote for their favorite author, and maybe not for the particular book that’s up for an award. The short time between announcement of the finalists and the final vote likely encourages this, as there’s not really enough time to read and evaluate all the candidates.

Wrap up of the 2018 World Fantasy Reviews

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That’s all the World Fantasy reviews, so now I’ll attempt an analysis of the list. When you look through these, a few interesting patterns emerge.

First, the diversity breakdown. Apologies if I miss anybody here:
BEST NOVEL: 1 man, 4 women, 1 Asian, 1 African American and 1 Native/African American. 1 LGBTQ
BEST NOVELLA: 1 non-binary, 1 man, 3 women, 1 African American, 1 Asian, 2 LGBTQ
SHORT FICTION: 1 man, 4 women, 3 Jewish, 1 Hispanic, 2 LGBTQ.
The totals add up to: 3/15 men (20%), 11/15 women (73%), 1/15 non-binary (7%), 2/15 Asian (13%), 1/15 Native American (7%), 1/15 Hispanic (7%), 3/15 Jewish (20%), 2/15 African American (13%), 5/15 LGBTQ (33%). Roanhorse complicates this calculation, but I’ve listed her as only Native America.

This year’s ballot continues the apparently universal trend toward mostly female writers, with only one token male nominated in each category. The system for nomination has done well in featuring at least one non-binary, Hispanic and Native American writer. Asian writers are, as usual, over-represented considering their 5% US population demographic, as are Jewish writers with a 1.5% US population demographic. The overrepresentation of Jewish writers this year follows the same pattern I found in the Nebula and Hugo Awards. The LGBTQ component here is also overrepresented, as the self-identifying gay and lesbian US population demographic for 2018 was 4.5%. Hispanic writers, as usual, remain hugely underrepresented with a US population demographic of 18%.

After reviewing the Nebula and Hugo Award finalists, I only had to read three short stories, one novella and two novels to finish out the set. There are a couple of possible implications to this. First, it suggests the Nebula and Hugo Awards might be trending to fantasy, and second, it indicates a convergence in the US fiction awards to particular works in any given year. The three awards work differently: the Nebula is awarded by the professional membership of the SFWA; the Hugo is awarded by members of WorldCon: and the World Fantasy Award is partially juried. Members of the current WFA convention and the previous two vote two nominations onto the final ballot, and the other three are named by a panel of judges. For the 2018 awards, the judges are Nancy Holder, Kathleen Jennings, Stephen Graham Jones, Garry Douglas Kilworth, and Tod McCoy.

Of course, there is the argument that particular works are elected by all three awards because they really are the best, or the more circular argument that these become the best because they’re elected. However, this kind of convergence in the major US awards remains troubling. It suggests a lack of diversity in either the marketplace or in the US awards systems. If more Native Americans were published, for example, all three awards might not elect the same writer, or if more African Americans were published, all three awards might not elect the same work.

Plus, there are also other possible explanations for convergence, such as a preference for certain content within the awards system. Of the three major US awards, the World Fantasy Award has the reputation for being the most literary, which suggests a definite preference in that direction. There is also evidence that the WFA system rewards creativity and artistic effect over standard story structures. Some of these works had little or nothing in the way of plot, and some might have qualified for a creative essay category instead. Others had serious suspension of disbelief issues. I notice there are some differences of opinion on quality out there in the readership audience. In checking out the authors, I encountered a few blogs that actually challenged the suitability of some works based on their content or execution. I personally think the Locus List has a big effect on convergence in the US awards, but interestingly, 4/15 writers (27%) of shorter works beat the odds and made it to the WFA ballot with entries that did not appear this year’s Locus List (although three of the four did appear for other works).

There was a reasonable diversity of publishers. Print magazines are clearly a failing paradigm where the awards are concerned—all the shorter finalists came from online magazines. As usual, Tor.com stood out, mostly because of the novella category, with 4/15 entries or 27%.

“Like a River Loves the Sky” by Emma Törzs

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This short story is a finalist for the 2019 World Fantasy Award. It was published in Uncanny Magazine, in the March-April 2018 issue. This review contains spoilers.

Adrianna’s best friend and housemate NPW is a taxidermist who picks up roadkill for subjects and works in the basement. Lately, he’s working on some kind of new technique that involves chanting and incense. Adrianna has no siblings and works for an estate sales firm that empties houses after someone dies. Her father is dead and her mother is in a nursing home with early-onset Alzheimer’s. Adrianna and NPW have been friends since they were kids, when NPW was a girl, and now NPW never hears from his parents except for regular prayer cards. NPW is moving up North to live with his girlfriend Robby, and Adrianna is sad. She has dreams that leave real artifacts behind, like blades of grass and wet clothes. When NPW leaves, the house seems filled with ghosts.

The most noticeable feature of this story is the imagery. The description, the sensory elements, and especially the narrative of the dreams, is exceptional. The characters are also strongly developed through both description and dialog, and the text is full of understated emotion related to Adrianna and NPW’s relationship and the hardship that is life and death. The dream artifacts are an evocative mystery that remains unexplained. The story ends with a final gift from NPW.

On the not so positive side, this is another story with a lot of decorative elements and no real plot. Adrianna and NPW talk and she dreams. NPW takes her to see her mom, and on the way back home they pick up another dead dog. They say good-bye and NPW leaves. That’s about it. The dead animals are sort of a gross-out, and adding horrific elements like this is starting to seem like a marketing gimmick to me. For anyone OCD, the loose ends here are also likely to be annoying. NPW’s new technique remains a compete mystery, and the dreams seem to have no function in the story, except to increase the artistic and fantasy feel of the narrative.

Regardless of the negatives, this is a highly artistic and well-developed short story, a glimpse into the life of a lonely girl with strange dreams who is losing her best friend. The artistic elements push up the rating.

Four and half stars.

“Ten Deals with the Indigo Snake” by Mel Kassel

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This short story is a finalist for the 2019 World Fantasy Award. It was published in Lightspeed, October 2018. This review contains spoilers.

Despite warnings, the narrator is fourteen when she makes her first deal with the indigo snake. The cost is to find the snake’s true name. The second deal is a few days later when the narrator trades her hair twice yearly in perpetuity for an A in chemistry. Years pass before she makes another deal, and then the costs begin to add up for success, for love, for escape from gambling debts. Will a support group help?

The basis for this story seems to be Eve’s transaction with the serpent in Eden, which provides an extra level of meaning and a certain universality. There’s also something about addiction in there. The snake can’t say no, and can only name a price. Unfortunately, it can also make deals with other people, which leads to complication when things start to get tight. The story has a pretty good hook and a rising action line as the costs start to pile up, then resolves when the narrator decides to seek help for her deal addiction.

On the less positive side, nothing quite catches fire here. The snake is pretty wholesome, and not Satanic at all. A darker, more sinister serpent would have raised the suspense level quite a bit, especially if it started to play one supplicant against another. Instead, we’re only left wondering how the narrator will mess up the next time, and whether or not she can find a solution that solves her problems without losing her left arm in the process. Since the author references the Biblical story of Eve, I was expecting this snake thing would be an affliction that affects only women, but it turns out that men suffer from it, too. That seems a little counter to subtext, but then maybe Eve passed the problem along to her kids. Also, a solution involving turtles here was kind of non-politically correct gross out. I know they’re reptiles, but still…

Three and a half stars.

“The Ten Things She Said While Dying: An Annotation” by Adam-Troy Castro

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This short story is a finalist for the 2019 World Fantasy Award. It was published by Nightmare Magazine in July of 2019. This review contains major spoilers.

Dr. Emmanuel Eggard, a brilliant scientist with personal hygiene problems, has been working on a matter transmission device, but while testing it, he accidently opens a portal into another plane. A demonic creature emerges from below his lung, splattering Eggard on the walls and fatally injuring Robyn Howlett, the clerical employee he has been pressuring for sex. The demonic creature waits to hear what Howlett has to say before making a decision on whether to offer her a deal for salvation.

This is written from the demon’s point of view and the annotations reveal its interpretation of Robyn’s words. She is understandably in desperate straits, but her situation, her personality and her character are revealed in the annotations. This isn’t very long, but it is fairly riveting, as the demon gives us plenty of information about itself, its reality and how limited humans really are in the grand scheme of things. The people who need to get a comeuppance then get it.

On the more negative side, this is definitely limited by its length. I think the idea could have easily been extended to novella length. This would give us some more extensive world-building and greater character development for everybody—something that’s just sketched in at this point. Castro has done just the minimum and depended on the comeuppance to carry the story.

Three and a half stars.

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