WarriorAnother element that sticks out in the episodes of Internet bullying/censorship I’ve reviewed here is the backlash. Because Internet activists have a tendency to go off half-cocked and to be over-zealous, they sometimes make mistakes about what the public actually thinks about something. Their goal is to sway public opinion with a media campaign, of course, but not everyone falls for this. There are actually a lot of critical thinkers out there. These include people like Ann Rice who are concerned about the social implications, plus the experts who are now labeling this trend as fascism.

There are advantages to having a prominent role as an activist. Your name gets repeated a lot in blogs and articles, which raises your profile as an author (or whatever). As I mentioned some months back, some people feel there is no such thing as negative publicity. This means they will pursue notoriety regardless of consequence. However, some of these activists have run afoul of public opinion and suffered for it. Jenny Trout was dropped by her publisher after the Fionna Man episode. Ann Rice, Kevin Weinberg and Marvin Kaye suffered from their efforts to counter some of these attacks. Sarah Wendell received a lot of negative attention after Vox Day featured her comments on his conservative blog. And Day is a prime example himself. Everyone in the SFF community should know his name after last year’s Hugo debacle, but most of the press is so negative that it leads people to discount his viewpoints.

This suggests that activism should be used cautiously as a way to advance ideas and/or to market yourself. It should also be used intelligently to further viewpoints. Attacking people like Fionna Man doesn’t help the progressive cause.

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